Review: Why classic music’s ‘culture of fear’ is much worse than Tár

Review: Why classic music’s ‘culture of fear’ is much worse than Tár

Review: Why classic music’s ‘culture of fear’ is much worse than Tár

Sarah Ioannides at Dallas Symphony Woman Symposium

Sarah Ioannides was interviewed by the Telegraph about the Tár movie:

…which a culture of discipline, precision, strict hierarchy and adulation of the usually male “maestro” has allowed such abuses of power to thrive unchallenged. A 2022 report by the Independent Society of Musicians (ISM) found that 66 per cent of women surveyed had experienced discrimination while at work, up from 47 per cent in 2018. “I don’t feel like the music industry has had its proper MeToo movement yet,” says Kathryn Williams, who co-authored the report. “And it seems to be getting worse.”

And yet an electrifying new film about such abuse in classical music turns our understanding of MeToo on its head. Todd Field’s Tár, in cinemas now, stars Cate Blanchett as the formidable world-famous conductor Lydia Tár, who humiliates students who don’t see things her way and seduces young female protégés – even going so far as to end their careers when they don’t comply.

“There is and has been manipulation in the industry; powerplay, unfairness, expectations, abuse – maybe even worse than the movie shows,” Sarah Ioannides, conductor and music director, Symphony Tacoma, tells me. “But I think [it’s] unfair to portray this of a woman conductor, especially when women have been so long held back from gaining access to the podium, continue to battle sexism [and] misogyny and […] are not well represented yet.”

Newsletter: New Year News Beat! Media releases, residency announcement, Cascade Conducting and More

Newsletter: New Year News Beat! Media releases, residency announcement, Cascade Conducting and More

Newsletter: New Year News Beat! Media releases, residency announcement, Cascade Conducting and More

The Winter Newsletter is out now – including NYO-USA resident conductor appointment, new media releases, Symphony Tacoma concert highlights, the 6th Cascade Conducting masterclass announcement and More!

Announcement: The 6th Annual Cascade Conducting Masterclass opens for applications!

Announcement: The 6th Annual Cascade Conducting Masterclass opens for applications!

Announcement: The 6th Annual Cascade Conducting Masterclass now opens for applications

Sarah Ioannides | Symphony Tacoma Music Director | Female Conductor and Composer

Led by orchestra conductor Sarah Ioannides, chorale conductor Dr. Geoffrey Boers, and this year joined internationally recognized conductor and composer, Ayis Ioannides, the Cascade Conducting Masterclass offers orchestral and choral conductors an incredible array of opportunities. With the motto “Excellence through Equity”, we welcome participants from diverse ethnic and professional backgrounds to join us. More than $10,000 worth of scholarships and financial aid are available.

News: Sarasota Orchestra December Programs Inspire Joy and Discovery for the Holiday Season

News: Sarasota Orchestra December Programs Inspire Joy and Discovery for the Holiday Season

News: Sarasota Orchestra December Programs Inspire Joy and Discovery for the Holiday Season

Sarah Ioannides | Symphony Tacoma Music Director | Female Conductor and Composer

Sarasota Orchestra brings joy to the season with favorites including its popular holiday-themed Great Escapes program. Lina González-Granados and Sarah Ioannides, already acclaimed conductors nationally and internationally, make their debuts on the Masterworks and Discoveries series, respectively, presenting inspired programs that include works by musical influencers and young composers alike.

Oxford-trained conductor Sarah Ioannides, music director of Symphony Tacoma, leads a program devoted to musical influencers-and those whom they inspired. Berlioz and Schumann both greatly admired the music of innovative 19th-century French composer Louise Farrenc, who battled sexism in music-and won. Liszt got the idea for Christus, an oratorio about the life of Christ, from Handel’s Messiah. In his exuberant Symphony in C Major, Bizet not only emulates, but directly quotes, his teacher Gounod.

Described by The New York Times as a conductor with “unquestionable strength and authority” and as a conductor with “magic,” Sarah Ioannides’ dynamic presence on the podium has won praise from audience and critics internationally.

Female conductors, composers are still rarities in classical music. How can that change?

Female conductors, composers are still rarities in classical music. How can that change?

Female conductors, composers are still rarities in classical music. How can that change?

Sarah Ioannides at Dallas Symphony Woman Symposium

In the U.S., the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra’s Nathalie Stutzmann is the only female music director at a major orchestra. Both the Dallas and Fort Worth symphony orchestras have never been led by female music directors, though the DSO has hired several female assistant conductors over the past few decades, and appointed Gemma New as principal guest conductor in 2018. The FWSO has also brought in more female guest conductors in recent seasons. Classical music groups across the country have also been programming more female composers, but they are still underrepresented.

The DSO’s fourth annual Women in Classical Music Symposium will address the lingering gender gaps — and speak to the challenges facing women moving toward leadership roles in classical music. From Nov. 6-9, the symposium will include panels and workshops to help attendees navigate barriers in the field. Around 300 people are expected to attend the event, including students from South Dallas, SMU and Plano ISD who have been invited to participate in some of the panels.

Participants can attend networking events and discussions on topics like the challenges of balancing work and personal life and the experiences of Black women in U.S. orchestras. The symposium will also feature a documentary viewing and discussion about Zohra, Afghanistan’s all-women orchestra that was evacuated from the country when the Taliban retook control.

A Nov. 8 symposium panel called “The Burden of Breaking Through: Power Structures and Paths to Progress” will be moderated by Elizabeth Myong, a reporter and producer for Arts Access — a new partnership between The Dallas Morning News and KERA. Vocalist Katherine Goforth, conductor Sarah Ioannides and DSO composer-in-residence Angélica Negrón will discuss how they’ve overcome barriers in classical music and the way biases and power dynamics contribute to the challenges they face.

Concert Preview: Grammy Award-winning Cellist Zuill Bailey Joins Symphony Tacoma for Caught in Love on November 19

Concert Preview: Grammy Award-winning Cellist Zuill Bailey Joins Symphony Tacoma for Caught in Love on November 19

Concert Preview: Grammy Award-winning Cellist Zuill Bailey Joins Symphony Tacoma for Caught in Love on November 19

Zuill Bailey
Symphony Tacoma welcomes internationally-renowned cellist Zuill Bailey to the Pantages stage for its November performance, Caught in Love. Comprising works characterized by their profound intensity, the concert will take place on Saturday, November 19, 2022 at 7:30 pm.

Widely considered one of the premier cellists today, Bailey performs on the “rosette” 1693 Gofriller cello, formerly owned by Mischa Schneider of the Budapest String Quartet. His rare combination of celebrated artistry, technical wizardry and engaging personality has secured his place as one of the most sought-after and active cellists today.

Bailey will perform Dvořák’s powerful Cello Concerto, sometimes called the “king of cello concertos.” One of the most musically demanding of all cello concerti, it is admired for the richness of its orchestral music as well as the lyrical writing for the solo cello. The soulful second movement reflects Dvořák’s mourning of the death of (and his unrequited love for) Josefina, his former piano pupil and his wife’s sister. Dvořák offers a final farewell to Josefina in the coda, which he described as “a gradual diminuendo, like a breath.”

Contemporary composer Jessie Montgomery interweaves classical music with elements of vernacular music, improvisation, poetry and social consciousness. In Caught by the Wind, she evokes images of movement. She describes the piece as being “about cycles—whether bicycles, life cycles, or wind cycles—it spins, journeys and winds, gets caught and ultimately comes to its end.”

Preceding the concert will be The Inside Scoop, a conversation moderated by PLU Professor Dr. Gregory Youtz with Bailey and Music Director Sarah Ioannides. All ticket holders are invited to participate in this event beginning at 6 pm in the concert hall.